Sep 152017
 

Concealed Carry Restrictions

The License is for Concealed Carry

There are some confusing signs in the Pueblo area that restrict your right to carry a concealed weapon. Some of the signs are on public or county properties and they are very visible. The first one that we have all seen says The Open Carrying of Firearms Or Deadly Weapons Within This Building Is Prohibited”   this sign is straightforward. You can not carry a gun that is exposed (open carry) like the cowboys did in the old days in this building. Concealed Carry is fine but it has to be concealed. The Confusing part of this sign is when it shows up somewhere that you can’t carry at all, like the 10th judicial court building where they have metal detectors and sheriff officers guarding the entrance.

Concealed Carry is allowed not open carryConcealed Carry Sign Pueblo West Library

The next one is a little tricky and people have told me that is says something different than it actually does. “Bringing in concealed weapons that are not legally licensed and permitted, or openly displaying a weapon except by law enforcement officials is prohibited”  this sign has two parts separated by a comma. The first part says you can’t bring a concealed weapon in unless it is licensed or permitted. The second part says no open carry except by law enforcement. These type of  Concealed Carry restrictions or notices are common. The problem ensues when a person doesn’t read the entire sign and really dissect what the meaning or intent is from the sign.

Remember it is your responsibility as a licensed concealed carry individual to know and understand all the restricted areas that you encounter in your normal travels around town,  restrictions apply but are not limited to, the Jail, Post Office, Court, Schools, Airports,Public Transportation(Bus),Colorado State Fair Grounds, and any place that has a metal detector or a sign posted with some restrictions.

Pueblo City Ordinance 11-1-601

 

The Pueblo City Ordinance  11-1-601 is very clear on the subject. It defines all the things you should not do and then tells you what you can do. Things like knife blade lengths and stun guns are discussed. If you live in the Pueblo area you should read this ordinance so that you are informed.

Restricted Concealed Carry Pueblo Colorado

Pueblo City Ord 11-1-601

 

 

Bank signs vary from location to location. One of the things that always comes up is the fact that no gun signs in Colorado have no force of law. What that means is that Colorado, unlike some other states, has some very weak language in their sign law.  So it has been said that in these locations all that can happen to you if caught with a firearm is to be asked to leave. If you refused you may be able to be charged with trespassing.  Timothy J. Priebe, Esq. an attorney in Colorado has written a paper called Should I Stay Or Should I Go where he discusses this issue. You should read and understand this document.

Bank Sign TexasThis sign is on one of the local banks in downtown Pueblo, Colorado it is totally bogus. This sign is the Texas Law 30-06 and these laws do not exist in Colorado. This bank just thinks most people will follow whatever sign they post or that gun owners are sheep.

 

As always none of this is legal advice. I advocate being informed and follow the law. To follow the law you must understand the difference between coffee table chat and knowledge. My class has new information in it all the time. If you are a concealed carry permit holder and you are up for renewal you would be wise to get some updated information so that you can make good decisions for you and your family.

This is a great reference book that everyone should have in their library.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Feb 262018
 

Gun Training On Your Schedule

Gun Training On Your Schedule

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gun training on your busy schedule? It’s hard to find time to do all the things in life that you want to get done. We have a solution to your gun training woes. Many of our students love our weekday and evening hours set aside for people who wish to get the training they need but don’t want to give up that precious weekend. The reason we can offer this gun training is that we have our own classroom and have shooting privileges at the only 10 lane indoor shooting range in Southern Colorado.

Many of our students rave about how easy it was for them to get the gun training they wanted and how we made the times and dates very accessible. Just tell us what Gun Training you would like to have and what date works for you and your friends and will try to make it happen. We find that people who have no gun handling experience do great in our class. We suggest you take the class before you buy a handgun. Many students who run out and buy a gun for the class are disappointed with their purchase. You will learn in class which gun is right for you.

-Let us know what works for you
-Bring some friends/or not
-Pick a date and time
-We will work with your schedule
-Don’t worry if you don’t have a gun.
-Training will be provided by Rick Sindeband one of the top instructors in the area.


Gun Safety
In all our classes gun safety is taught, you will know the safe and proper handling method for your firearm

 

Gun Laws
We are not Attorneys and you should always consult one for legal matters, but we will give you the best information available on current laws and regulations regarding guns and gun handling. We will be covering shoot and no shoot scenarios and learn when we can actually use deadly force for self-defense

 

Hands-on Gun Training
You will learn what is considered to be the very best gun handling skills so that you can be confident that you can handle your gun safely in and out of your home

Get the Training when you want. We will make it happen on your schedule
Many types of training are available on your schedule. Sign up below and let us know what your training needs are and when the best time is for you to get the training you need.

Articles of Interest

Concealed Carry Permit Renewal
Concealed Handgun Definition in Colorado
Intervention With a Concealed Handgun
Having a Sound Self Defense Strategy
Learn To Shoot

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Sep 102017
 

Shooting Grip Is Important When Shooting
By: Rick Sindeband

Photography: Lesli Sindeband

I see many people using the old “cup and saucer” shooting grip when I am working at the range. If you’re not familiar with this check the internet and you’ll see why it’s a bad grip that hasn’t been taught in decades by reputable instructors.
cup and saucer grip method

The grip that I recommend and that the top shooters use is the Thumbs Forward shooting grip. This allows you to put a lot of flesh on the gun and when new shooters try this grip it almost always improves their accuracy. Proper grip is very important when shooting a handgun. As a handgun is fired it begins to recoil before the bullet has exited the barrel. To achieve the desired results (shots on target) it is essential that the grip remains consistent after each shot. Often I see shooters at the range readjust their grip after each shot. The first shot seats the gun firmly into the hand, readjusting the grip at that point will loosen and change the grip. Grasp the weapon with the web of the hand pressed firmly into the back strap of the grip and once the first shot is fired, do not adjust the grip. Remember if you are a Concealed Carry Permit holder – when drawing from a holster you are committed to whatever grip your hand has when the gun leaves the holster.

shooting grip 1

 

With your primary shooting hand, open your thumb and index finger. Push the web of your hand as high as it will comfortably go on the handgun grip, making sure that the barrel of the gun lines up with the bones in your forearm. Wrap your fingers around the front of the grip, making sure to keep your index finger out of the trigger guard and off the trigger. This is one of the major safety violations.

 

shooting grip 2

 

Do you see some free space on the inside grip panel of your handgun? Great, that’s where the bottom part (heel) of your support hand palm goes. Put it in that open spot and don’t worry if there’s not enough room to get your whole palm on the inside grip panel. There won’t be and that’s fine.

 

 

shooting grip 3

 

Now wrap your support hand fingers around the front of your dominant hand fingers. Your support hand fingers should be high–to the point of pressing against the bottom of the trigger guard.

 

 

shooting grip 4

 

You’ll know you’ve got it right if both of your thumbs are somewhere near parallel to each other and touching.

 

 

 

 

The Grip must be consistent for each shot
A good grip enhances the accuracy
Your hand must be high on the back strap
The finger must reach the trigger
These techniques will reduce muzzle rise
A good grip lends to faster recoil recovery
You should be using a crush grip with support wrist locked
Weakside fingers should be wrapped around the strong hand
Wrists should be close together
Supporting hand heel should be in contact with the weapon grip
Thumbs should rest on top of another.
Fingers over Fingers Thumb over Thumb

When the grip is acquired in the holster, prior to draw and presentation the web of the shooting hand must be in the top of tang on the back-strap and no higher. If you are too high the slide will bite your hand. If you are too low with your grip you allow the gun to move more with recoil making sight recovery and follow-on shots more difficult and time-consuming. A key point is to have both thumbs pointing at the target. The heal of your non-shooting hand should cover the area on the grip that is exposed.

Your shooting grip is just one of the factors that go into becoming a great shot and learning to shoot well.

Articles of Interest:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Jun 132018
 

Can it be Dennis Tueller of the infamous Tueller Drill

Dennis Tueller Glock Instructor and Tueller Drill StudyI Left Pueblo about 4 am Tuesday morning and headed north for a Glock Armorers Class to be held in Northern Colorado at Liberty Firearms Institute in Johnstown Colorado. I had scheduled the class several months before and was looking forward to it. One of the local gun emporiums had arranged for me to go under their Dealer Stocking Program. These programs are designed for Law Enforcement and Military and everyone is not eligible to go. The Class was being taught by a Glock Representative who had been with Glock about 15 years by the name of Dennis Tueller. Dennis started the class by telling the group of mostly Law Enforcement Officers a story about his Law Enforcement career in Salt Lake City, Utah where he was a firearms instructor and had other duties with the PD there. After a long Law Enforcement career Glock came along and offered him a job when he retired and now this is what he does full time. Dennis travels and Certifies Glock Armorers.

So the wheels started to turn in my head and the name Dennis Tueller is synonymous with the Tueller Drill that we all study in most good Concealed Carry Classes. That Tueller was also from the Salt Lake City area and so at the break, I had to ask. He smiled and looked at me and said he had not expected anyone to recognize him for that and he was flattered. He then conceded that sometimes people have attached his name to the concept that we all teach about 21 feet especially Massad Ayoob. Anyone who has had one of my classes knows about this study. Dennis was very humble about the whole thing and we talked about those times and he even spoke during class about his training with Jeff Cooper and other industry greats.

In The Tueller Drill study Sergeant Dennis Tueller, of the Salt Lake City, Utah Police Department wondered how quickly an attacker with a knife could cover 21 feet (6.4 m), so he timed volunteers as they raced to stab the target. He determined that it could be done in 1.5 seconds. These results were first published as an article in SWAT magazine in 1983 and in a police training video by the same title, “How Close is Too Close?”

It was amazing to me that the group of young law enforcement officers had no idea who they were spending the next 8 hours with. This guy was old school, 1911, police officer, firearm industry royalty. It turned out he was a great instructor and I enjoyed the class very much. Many of his stories and quips kept us on our toes for the full 8 hours. After the practical portion which consisted of taking 3 generations of Glocks completely apart and putting them back together so they would work, we then had the written exam. Great day, Great Instructor, Great Class. I would love to take a firearms class from this guy and I’m proud to announce I am now a Certified Glock Armorer.

As a Glock Armorer, I am going to be offering some custom services on Glock guns. I have been stippling some gun frames for shooters and changing sites, mag releases and slide stop on Glocks, Sigs, S&W and Walthers to name a few. I have been working on pistols and shotguns for several years mostly for friends and family. Last year I built an AR Pistol that was a lot of fun. I am in the process of customizing a Glock 43 and I will be publishing some pictures when it is done. If anyone is having problems with a Glock I would be glad to look at it.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Mar 312014
 





Conceal Carry Draw and Presentation

When you make a choice to conceal carry a gun it is important to get proper training and practice so you can handle your equipment safely and effectively. One area usually missing is learning to draw from your conceal carry holster. When you draw well, it can be the difference between life and death. During this class you will learn and practice the steps needed to draw properly from a conceal carry holster. With practice you will master the steps and combine them into one fluid motion. The draw is one of the most important aspects of conceal carry and handgun self defense . The instructors for the seminar are Rick Sindeband and Patrick Watts. Both instructors have over 20 years of experience with firearms.

Conceal Carry Draw and Presentation Class

When: April 27, 2014
Time: 1 to 4 PM
Where: Pueblo Municipal Shooters, Inc.
Cost: $35 PMS members / $45 non-members
Phone: 719-821-3958
Class size is limited Sign up Today

Conceal Carry Draw and Presentation Prerequisites

Prerequisites: 18 years old
What to bring:
Centerfire Handgun that fits your strong side holster
3 magazines/speed loader
2 support magazine/ speed loaders holders
100 rounds of ammunition
Sturdy belt

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Nov 302013
 

Choosing a defensive firearmChoosing a Defensive Firearm for a Carry Gun
By: Jeff Belanger, Instructor,Gunsmith
Doubletapweapons.com

Choosing a Defensive Firearm

As an instructor I’m not a big fan of the snub nosed .38 special revolver as a defensive firearm for new shooters. A few people have written back asking what I do think a good choice would be. Since it’s never as simple as saying “Gun X” is the must have carry gun. I’ll explain my criteria when shopping for a new defensive firearm and hopefully something I write will help you when you’re making your next selection. The first question I ask myself is “What is the firearm’s primary purpose?”. If I’m shopping for a gun to always have with me at all times (the gun I carry when I don’t want to carry a gun), size and concealability will be more important to me than caliber. Once I know what I’m looking for, I’ll do some research and figure out who is making something which meets my criteria. Honestly, I do a lot of my weeding out right here. Just like lots of people who wouldn’t ever drive a certain make of car, there are firearms manufacturers out there whose products have always seemed substandard to me or caused me nothing but grief. As a gunsmith, if a certain gun is something I see in the shop quite a bit I guarantee you I wouldn’t bet my life on  I’ll read internet reviews and see what people have to say about something, and then I’ll head off to the gun stores so I can actually hold the firearms I’m considering.

No More Than 5 Defensive Firearm Choices

Typically, my list of prospective choices is no more than 5 guns at this point. Keeping with my pocket pistol example, maybe I’ll find one that’s single action only. Since I know I’m not comfortable carrying a cocked gun in my pants pocket- I’ll take that off the list right now. Maybe the next one I look at is too small (or too large) for my needs- that’ll come off my list too. After familiarizing myself with the remaining defensive firearms and their controls, I’ll evaluate my two most important criteria next. “Does it point naturally?” and “Can I work it?” Holding the gun in my shooting grasp I’ll look at something (remember your safety rules here!) and bring the gun up as if to shoot. I then check to see if the sights have naturally aligned on the target or if I need to make an adjustment. I’II do this a few times to see if the gun is pointing where my brain thinks it should be. My goal here is not to find a gun that I can aim, but to find the gun that aims itself for the ones that do stay very high on my diminishing list of choices. “Can I work it?” is probably the most important aspect to consider- especially for women. You need to make sure you can manipulate the defensive firearm in every way possible. Ask yourself- Am I strong enough to rack the slide, lock the slide back? Can I release the magazine easily? If a revolver- am I strong enough to pull the trigger? etc. The answers will be different for each individual, and only the actual shooter can answer them. You’ll need to do all these things to load/unload your firearm, clear malfunctions, and operate it competently. If you’re lucky enough to have more than one choice left at this point, I would next consider accessories and caliber. It does you no good to have a carry pistol nobody makes a holster for or a semi-auto with magazines that are impossible to find. As to caliber, remember that smaller/lighter guns will always recoil more than a larger heavier gun in the same caliber. Generally, I always want the largest caliber I can comfortably handle when shooting, but this is never a deal breaker for me. The .380 I actually have with me when I need it will always be more effective than the .45 I left at home. Lastly, I try not to let price become a determining factor in choosing a defensive firearm.

Defensive Firearm at a Discount

If you wouldn’t buy a discount parachute at a garage sale, you shouldn’t treat your defensive firearm purchase any differently. I don’t know anyone who would consent to being maimed or killed for a couple hundred dollars, but people constantly take that risk when they stand at the gun counter and choose the discount budget brand gun which may not work when they need it most. This is something you are literally going to bet your life on if the time ever comes, treat your purchase with the seriousness it warrants. Be safe shoot straight and have fun out there!!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail