Mar 212020
 

Common mistakes pistol owners make contribute to many of the accidents we see both at the range and in gun owner’s personal lives.

common mistakes pistol owners make

Muzzle Direction

Muzzle direction is the most important rule of gun safety. When looking at a handgun in the gun store don’t point it at the salesperson or at other customers in the store. Many gun owners think guns are unloaded in these places so it doesn’t matter. Did you check the firearm properly to see its loaded condition when it was handed to you? Do you know how to pass a firearm correctly to another person? If not these are common gun handling skills everyone should have.

Left to Right Rack

I see a lot of people who have a bad habit of what I call Left to Right Rack. If you point the gun to the left when you rack it (when your a right-handed shooter) you are most likely pointing it somewhere you are not supposed to. Sometimes the person in the shooting lane next to you at the range. Sometimes a family member or a shooting partner when your out on the north 40. Turn sideways to your target and hold the firearm close to your chest this will force you to point it in the safe direction and it makes the gun easier to manipulate. Racking the slide properly  will put you on your way to being a great gun handler

Hand in Front of Muzzle

Why would you stick your hand in front of the muzzle? You shouldn’t! Racking your gun from the front of the slide can cause your hand to inadvertently slip in front of the loaded gun’s muzzle. Use the serrations on the back of the slide either with the hand over method or the slingshot method. I see a lot of people reach out in front of the firearm when manipulating the firearm or reaching for something on the benchtop at the range.

Pulling the Trigger on an Empty Gun

I’m not talking about dry-fire. I’m talking about taking the pressure off the cocked trigger of your firearm when putting the gun away or in its case. If you have a 1911 style single action gun learn how to decock it properly don’t pull the trigger and let the hammer fall. On the striker-fired weapons leave them alone. There is no reason to pull the trigger and you are just asking for an accident. Only pull the trigger when you have your sights on something you intend to shoot.

Index your finger on the slide

It takes a little practice but you can learn to index your finger on the gun so that you don’t touch the trigger. This translates into great form when you draw from your holster. Use the micro training technique and practice practice practice.

Soon you will be a great gun handler and Common mistakes pistol owners make will be something you will read about not something you are doing yourself.

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Feb 272020
 

2020STRAP VIRUS for Concealed Firearms

 

Do you have the 2020STRAP Virus? According to the online slang dictionary to be strapped is to carry a firearm. Are you carrying a concealed firearm everywhere that you can? Or do you only carry a concealed firearm when you think you’re going to need it?  Murphy’s law says you will only need it when you don’t have it with you. As responsibly armed citizens, we have to carry everywhere we can legally. So what do you do when you go to the post office? Lock your gun in your vehicle gun safe not your glovebox or center console. Three Hundred plus guns that were left in cars in one of our neighboring cities were stolen in January.

The cure is to get inoculated with the P4 anti-virus. You can get your cure here without even going to the doctor or the pharmacy.

P (Practice)-Are you practicing with your handgun so that you can put shots on target at 21 feet in less than 3 seconds from concealment? Are you practicing with your firearm so that your familiarity and comfort level is good with your firearm? You have to be confident that you are handling your firearm correctly and safely. Practice some dry fire routines in front of a mirror. Check your draw stroke is it efficient and not full of unnecessary movement and motion. Are you carrying in a position on your body that is not good for you? Learn what the different carry positions are and the pros and cons of each.

P (Patience)-These skills don’t happen overnight you must practice the fundamentals and do it right every time. It’s not about how fast you can do it. It’s about doing it right so that not only is it right but it’s smooth. When you are smooth you will be fast. Take all the unnecessary steps out of your draw and presentation and practice frequently (with an unloaded gun of course). Dry firing is a skill that everyone needs to practice and understand.

P (Persistence)- Keep up your practice and don’t let your guard down. You have to practice frequently both dry fire and live fire. Try to keep a schedule of training in writing. It will help you to keep on track.

P (Purchase)- Buy a proper safe for your auto. Proper holsters, a shot timer, and the use of proper targets and training drills will all help you to succeed to the level you want to achieve. I have many drills and downloadable targets that you can use to irradicate the 2020STRAP VIRUS.

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Feb 092020
 

One of the biggest problems concealed carry holders have to tackle is concealed carry holster selection.

Almost everyone has gone through many holsters and struggled about the selection and carry position. Many of us have boxes of holsters that we have tried and discarded because of safety or comfort. It is not an easy process and there is no one solution for everyone.

Concealed carry holster selection and carry position

Comfort and convenience-there is no perfect selection you are never going to be perfectly comfortable carrying a gun. You will always know you have it and you should for safety reasons. Carrying in the perfect position where you will always be able to get to your gun when seated in your car or in a booth at your favorite restaurant is a matter of practice. You will get comfortable with your carry position over time.

comfortable and small– carried in your pocket or on your ankle or even in a purse may not be the best method to be able to defend yourself and in a lot of cases these methods are unsafe and slow. The gun may not be effective because of its size or caliber and it may take you too long to actually put the handgun into service. Off body carry of a handgun can be one of the most dangerous ways to carry.

Carrying in a position that’s far from your neutral position

Optimal concealed carry holster selection puts your handgun in the best zone for presentation and that is your strong side- Right-handed right side of your body. Left-handed is left side of your body. From your Centerline or belt buckle back to 4 o’clock on either side is optimal. This allows for quick access from the neutral position which is hands in front of you just above your waist palms facing out like you are saying stop!! 3 o’clock strong side hip and appendix AIWB are the best locations for speed and safety. It is optimal for you to learn strong side belt holster first as it teaches the safety concepts of drawing from the holster. Once you have accomplished that you can advance to appendix carry and be able to safely deploy your firearm with practice.

Remember that we have a range locally that only allows strong side holster draw. Why you ask? Because it has been shown to be the safest method available. Remember also that only one in a hundred instructors are certified to teach draw from the holster. That is because of the safety aspect and that it is an advanced skill. Many of you have taken Hotel classes or gun show classes and you learned what to do by the internet. This is not always the best course of action.

Concealed carry holster selection Leather vs Nylon vs Kydex.

Leather tends to get worn out and loose and things sometimes get in the trigger area and that can cause the gun to go off unintentionally. There are leather holsters that list on the package that they fit 20 guns. These are not safe in a lot of cases for concealed carry holster selection. Nylon holsters or floppy material like cloth are very unsafe and should only be used for special situations. Kydex is the best choice for safety and concealment. Kydex does not collapse when a gun is drawn and it always holds it shape.

Concealed Carry Holster Selection

Criteria for concealed carry holster selection

1. allows a full grip on the handgun

2. covers the trigger and trigger guard completely

3. has unassisted retention ( when you turn the holstered gun upsidedown it does not fall out)

4. does not collapse when the gun is drawn

 

 

Be sure to learn concealed carry holster selection and use from a professional that knows what they are doing.

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Jan 262020
 

Concealed Carry TrainingConcealed Carry Training is a must if you want to be able to defend yourself and your family. Let’s face it most people who carry a concealed firearm for self-defense are not skilled with the tools of the trade. Many are in denial. They think they will be good enough when they need to use their gun in self-defense. Many people I see have had a permit for more than 5 years many of them going on 10 and most of them have not kept up with their concealed carry training or never learned the skills necessary to survive in their first and only concealed carry training class.

The Most Important Concealed Carry Skills

The First Skill of concealed carry is to know and practice the 4 rules of gun safety. These are not suggestions they are the bible when it comes to gun handling. Live by these rules. Watch that muzzle direction when handling your firearm. Keep all body parts away from the muzzle. Too many people are putting their hands in front of the muzzle. Know these rules forward and backward. Know them by their numbers. If I talk about rule number 3 you ought to know what that is. Come on people there are only 2 keywords for every safety rule. It is not rocket science!

The Second Skill of concealed carry training is to learn your gun. I see many students who do not know their guns. Many don’t know how to work the safety if they have one and lots of the students cant properly load and unload their firearm without violating several safety rules (remember there are 4 safety rules). Many people choose the wrong gun. It doesn’t fit their hand (too small too big). The fact is people think the first criteria of a concealed handgun is it has to be small.

Small Guns-the Good and The Bad!

Small guns are hard to shoot and are not as accurate. Many times come in calibers that are either expensive to shoot or are not good at stopping a threat. Other guns have too many complex controls (single action only gun (1911) or a Traditional Semi-Auto that have a hammer and a decocker. These guns are great for some people, but for many its, either an accident waiting to happen or they just don’t have the skills to operate the gun efficiently or safely. Do yourself a favor and train with a point and shoot type gun that doesn’t have a hammer or a safety.

The Third Skill of concealed carry is to be able to put meaningful shots on a humanoid target in a short amount of time at the distances required. For starters, many people just think that going to the range and plinking is practice. It isn’t. You need to time yourself and you have to get accurate shots at meaningful distances on the target where they will count. I have many easy practice routines that you can run and your skill level will increase substantially.

The Importance of Skill #4 is Often Overlooked

The Fourth Skill is your draw and presentation of the gun. You need to be able to draw from your normal concealed carry position and put a couple of shots center mass at 3-5 and 7 yards in less than 2 seconds. Many current events in the news have shown us that the people who lost their lives in these self-defense events did not have these skills. There are many more Concealed Carry Training skills but these 4 are primary. By Primary I mean this is where you have to start. If you can’t do it with your current equipment (holster, the position you carry your gun on your body, or the type of gun you carry) then now is the time to change.

Remember I can help you get through this maze and make you a better gun handler.

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Dec 142019
 

USCCA Concealed Carry

USCCA Concealed Carry and Home Defense Fundamentals

Rick Sindeband, of Have Gun Will Train Colorado, has become a Certified Instructor with the United States Concealed Carry Association (USCCA). He will be offering the Concealed Carry and Home Defense Fundamentals program here in Pueblo, Colorado and surrounding areas for people that wish to obtain their concealed carry permit or interested in defending their family in their home. The program’s focus is on developing a personal and home protection plan, but concealed carry issues are the main focus. In other words, this class gives you what you need to carry a concealed handgun with confidence and safety. Above all, this course gives you the tools you need to succeed and, the training materials are some of the best in the industry.

The program textbook is written by Michael Martin whose credits include Firefighter/EMT, NRA Instructor, graduate of the International Association of Law Enforcement Firearms Master Instructors Course, and VP of Delta Media the parent company of the United States Concealed Carry Association.

USCCA Concealed Carry and Home Defense Fundamentals

Concealed Carry and Home Defense Fundamentals is a comprehensive course for anyone considering owning or carrying a firearm for self-defense. The course is a complete guide to understanding conflict-avoidance and situational awareness; home security and home defense; handgun, shotgun, and AR-15 basics; shooting fundamentals; the physiology of violent encounters; the legal aspects of using deadly force (including knowing what to do in the aftermath); and a complete guide on gear, gadgets, and ongoing training.

About The USCCA

In 2003, Tonnie Schmidt and Tim Schmidt founded Delta Defense and the United States Concealed Carry Association (USCCA) and began publishing a self-defense magazine that focused on responsible firearms ownership. This magazine grew into a national association providing self-defense education, training, and legal protection to its members.

The U.S. Concealed Carry Association (USCCA) provides self-defense education, training, and legal protection, responsible American gun owners.  The USCCA is the largest and fastest-growing association whose sole focus is the responsibly armed American and is headquartered in West Bend, WI.

The USCCA has more than 300,000 members and 2 million newsletter subscribers. Delta Defense employs over 240 people in 12 states and was named to the Inc. 5000 list of America’s fastest-growing private companies in 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018

Become a member today

USCCA Concealed Carry Protection

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now Offering Basic Pistol and Concealed Carry and Home Defense Fundamentals training.  Sign Up Today
Contact me for additional information
about these and other programs.

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Nov 282019
 

Trigger Finger an important part of the shooting equationTrigger Finger an important part of the shooting equation

In general the term “trigger control” is used to describe the act of moving the trigger and firing the gun without disturbing your aim. All of the fundamentals are rolled into firing the shot, but the two biggest fundamentals are aiming and trigger control, in that order. How you move the trigger can work for or against you. The best method of controlling a trigger, for all levels of shooters, is to move the trigger straight to the rear, firing the gun without disturbing your aim. Try using the tip of a pen. Hold it in your finger and practice like it is your trigger. Not fast like my old mentor Patrick Watts used to tell me to take out the slack and press.

It starts with the placement of the trigger finger on the trigger. The middle of the pad on your fingertip—the most sensitive part of your finger—is the preferred position for finger placement ( for the striker-fired handguns (Glock, Smith & Wesson, Springfield, Ruger, Sig). For Revolvers, it takes more finger usually all the way to the first crease in your finger called the power crease.  But maintaining perfect aim as the shot is fired is much more important than putting the trigger finger in a “preferred position” on the trigger. Your best contact point might not be the same as the shooter’s beside you. How do you find it? Try this dry-firing exercise.

Drill of the Week: The Wall Drill

The Wall Drill was developed by George Harris and is one of the most effective ways to perfect your shooting fundamentals.

Like any dry-fire drill, it is critically important that you follow proper precautions. First, you must always obey the Cardinal Rules of Firearms Safety even during dry-fire practice. Also, all weapons must be completely unloaded and double-checked before the start of this drill.

Once you have cleared your weapon and verified both visually and physically that it is empty (twice), remove all ammunition from your training area and find a wall that can serve as a proper backstop in case of an accident. The wall should be blank, with no visual distractions and most importantly nothing to “aim” at during the drill.

Some people like to use dummy rounds to protect the internal parts of your handgun from excessive and unnecessary wear. Check your owner’s manual for dry firing information on your gun.

Holding your unloaded pistol in a normal shooting grip and stance, press the muzzle to the wall until it just barely makes contact, then back off about an inch. Because you are using a blank wall as your backstop, you effectively have no target. There is nothing for you to focus on except your front sight.

From this position, practice your trigger manipulation. The goal is to press the trigger straight back with consistent pressure until the “shot” breaks without disturbing your sight alignment throughout the process. Remember, that is the key to accuracy — a proper trigger press that doesn’t mess up your sight picture.

If your front sight moves around or “hops” as the trigger breaks, slow down and pay more attention to your grip and finger movement. Are you putting pressure on the grip with your other fingers as you press the trigger? Are you pressing the trigger too fast or too hard, causing it to move at the last moment? Just work on keeping everything still except your trigger finger, and move your finger in a slow, smooth, relaxed trigger press.

Practicing this and other drills will make you a better shooter and as you practice you will see the improvement. As always I am available for help and private shooting sessions.

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