Sep 202018
 

Greg Ellifritz (Active Response Training) told a story in a recent post of a man who had all the lingo of a good gun handler, had all the top equipment, but in an actual self-defense moment when he had to perform he became a basket case. The Concealed Carry Podcast also recently talked about the eighty-twenty handgun training principal and gave some indication of what they felt were important and not so important training issues. It has been shown that 80% of what we worry about or focus on does not help us achieve the 20% that’s important. This concept is known as the Pareto Rule.

Many people in the Concealed Carry community spend 80% of their time worrying about their equipment (Guns, Lights, Lasers, and toys). Gear matters a lot less than you might think. If we develop skills,  gear becomes even less important. It’s funny how we tend to worry about the things that are not important. We need to focus on the things that count. I remember a saying my dad use to tell my youngest daughter. He would say worry in sequence. I wonder if this isn’t the same concept.

So I’m going to put four items or skills in the 20% column and let’s look at them.

GRIP– a grip needs to be consistent, putting a lot of flesh on the gun. This will also mitigate recoil and its obvious problems.

TRIGGER CONTROL-trigger control is different for different types of triggers. Single action triggers get the pad of the index finger only. Double action triggers use more of the finger normally all the way to the power crease or the crease in the first joint of the index finger.

AIMING-aiming relates to sighted fire and unsighted fire. Knowing how to use both and when to use each is an important skill.

DRAW FROM THE HOLSTER– draw from the holster is a book all by itself. Most people believe that you must learn the strong side belt holster technique and then move to other types of holsters and carry positions. Proper holster technique is essential both for safety and for the ability to smoothly access your handgun in adverse situations.

Some skills will not be listed in the 20% because they are considered to be secondary skills. Not necessarily advanced but not as important as the four primary skills.

STANCEone of the reasons this is not a 20% skill is that a proper stance is stable and comfortable. You do not know how or where you will be standing in a self-defense situation. You need to learn to shoot from many positions.

MAGAZINE DRILLS-loading and unloading under stress is important for several reasons but stats show that most self-defense situations end in 3 rounds or less. Most altercations happen at a distance of fewer than 3 yards, are over in approximately 3 seconds or less, and have 3 or fewer shots fired. (3-3-3)

Eighty-Twenty Handgun Training Principal

Other skills that may be important after the 20% is mastered.

MALFUNCTION DRILLS-while you may think of this as a primary skill it is really an advanced skill. Sure you need to know how to get your gun back into the fight if it isn’t working, but all the other skills have to be in place before this is important.

STRONG SIDE and WEAK HAND SHOOTING– while this skill is obviously important it is way down the list of things you should be training for.

You should have a baseline for your shooting ability. In other words a measurement of where your skills are today. Then thru out your training, you should go back and see that your baseline has moved, hopefully for the better. Here is a good baseline drill provided by Claude Werner (The Tactical Professor).

This is what it comes down to. You have to learn to effectively and efficiently handle your firearm. From the holster and presentation to shots on target. To do that your 20% skills have to be mastered. As you become more experienced you can start to throw additional skills into the mix (i.e. week hand shooting and malfunction drills). Find a gun that fits you. Learn to function the gun safely and efficiently. Learn to draw your firearm smoothly from the holster and put shots on target at respectable self-defense distances. That’s the eighty-twenty handgun training principal in a nutshell.

Other Article that may be of interest:

Concealed Carry Permit Renewal
Concealed Handgun Definition in Colorado
Intervention With a Concealed Handgun
Having a Sound Self Defense Strategy
Learn To Shoot

 

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Jan 012018
 

Improper Concealed Handgun Carry

Intervention with a Concealed Handgun in situations not involving you!

I teach in all my classes that you are risking your Life, Freedom, and Financial Loss when you step outside of your family circle and close friends to protect someone with your concealed handgun. There are many ways this kind of activity can go bad for you. It doesn’t take much to understand that many criminal actors have associates that are standing by just in case the need arises to step in and help. It takes a very alert individual to spot these associates and recognize the risk involved. It is very common for this scenario to exist in armed robberies. In some cases maybe an undercover police officer is involved or is close by. Remember that when you pull your concealed handgun in public no one knows you from the criminals.

The story that always sticks in my mind is the man who is in Walmart when a gunman starts shooting people and the armed citizen thinks he is in a position to take the criminal out and save the day. Unfortunately for our armed hero, he does not understand that the criminal’s girlfriend is standing behind him and when he accesses his concealed handgun she shoots him in the back and kills the good Samaritan.

There are many examples of this kind of situation in personal defense. I did not realize until recently that this topic was even discussed in the bible.  He that passeth by, and meddleth with strife belonging not to him, is like one that taketh a dog by the ears.  (Proverbs 26:17) apparently, this has been true for thousands of years and still is today.

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Dec 102017
 

Choosing a defensive firearm

choosing a defensive firearmThroughout the year I have published many articles from different sources about picking firearms and ammunition for self-defense. Here is some information for you to consider when choosing a defensive firearm and ammunition for self-defense.

Instructors polled at a recently held high-level instructor conference (not the NRA) showed that the two handguns that were most prevalent in their daily carry were Glock and Smith & Wesson M&P series firearms.  90% of those instructors polled we’re carrying a 9mm caliber firearm.  The firearms broken down into the two biggest categories by the manufacturer were 40% Glock and 26% of them were carrying a Smith & Wesson M&P series firearm. Reliability was the reason these two guns are carried the most. When you pull the trigger on these self-defense guns they are more likely to go bang every time. It was stated that no one at the conference was carrying a Springfield XD series gun and that only one person was carrying a 1911 style handgun.

The instructors were also polled about their defensive firearm rounds. 74% were using either Federal HST or Speer Gold Dot. A small percentage were using Hornady Personal Protection rounds. 68%  of those polled were carrying standard pressure rounds no + P or + P +, as some state,  standard P or no P was the choice of professionals. Many in the group were carrying guns that had been modified with sites or grip enhancements like stippling. About 75% of them were in possession of some type of emergency medical equipment.

It is very insightful to take the information that professionals think is important for their daily survival and use it to make good choices in your self-defense firearm purchases and daily carrying options.

Most professionals carry a Glock or Smith and Wesson M&P series handguns.
Most professionals carried a 9mm caliber gun.
Most professionals used Federal HST or Speer Gold Dot ammo in those guns.
Many are prepared for some type of medical emergency.

Many of us make choices when Choosing A Defensive Firearm based on many factors.  Sometimes those decisions are based on finances or style. This information does not come from someone trying to sell you something. Most articles written in the industry are promoting an item so that people will buy it. This information was provided by professionals in the business of training people and it is what they use to protect themselves and their families.

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Nov 082015
 

The 21 Foot Rule (Not Really a Rule)

According to Massad Ayoob in his book Deadly Force – Understanding Your Right to Self Defense– Ability, Opportunity, and Jeopardy must exist for you to use Deadly Force. “The situation of immediate danger of death or crippling injury is normally determined by the simultaneous presence of three criteria. Different schools use different terminology, but the most widely used and court-proven standard has been in use for decades: Ability, Opportunity, and Jeopardy. “Ability” means that the assailant possesses the power to kill or cripple. “Opportunity” means he is capable of immediately employing that power. “Jeopardy” means that his actions and/ or words indicate to a reasonable, prudent person that he intends to do so and is about to do so.”

Everyone talks about the 21 foot rule this is part of Opportunity…..remember its a study not a rule and you may only be able to introduce it in a legal situation or trial when you can prove that you new about it and have been trained with the drills prior to the incident. In Massad Ayoobs book “Deadly Force” he says “Be Trained! Training is discoverable, and therefore introducible to educate the jury

Ayoob, Massad (2014-11-25) Deadly Force – Understanding Your Right to Self

The Tueller Drill is a self-defense training exercise to prepare against a short-range knife or contact weapon attack when armed only with a holstered handgun. Sergeant Dennis Tueller, of the Salt Lake City, Utah Police Department wondered how quickly an attacker with a knife could cover 21 feet (6.4 m), so he timed volunteers as they raced to stab the target. He determined that it could be done in 1.5 seconds. These results were first published as an article in SWAT magazine in 1983 and in a police training video by the same title, “How Close is Too Close?”A defender with a gun has a dilemma. If he shoots too early, he risks being charged with murder. If he waits until the attacker is definitely within striking range so there is no question about motives, he risks injury and even death. The Tueller experiments quantified a “danger zone” where an attacker presented a clear threat. The Tueller Drill combines both parts of the original time trials by Tueller.

There are several ways it can be conducted:

The “attacker and shooter are positioned back-to-back. At the signal, the attacker sprints away from the shooter, and the shooter unholsters his gun and shoots at the target 21 feet (6.4 m) in front of him. The attacker stops as soon as the shot is fired. The shooter is successful only if his shot is good and if the runner did not cover 21 feet (6.4 m).

A more stressful arrangement is to have the attacker begin 21 feet (6.4 m) behind the shooter and run towards the shooter. The shooter is successful only if he was able take a good shot before he is tapped on the back by the attacker.

If the shooter is armed with only a training replica gun, a full-contact drill may be done with the attacker running towards the shooter. In this variation, the shooter should practice side-stepping the attacker while he is drawing the gun.
You can see the original article by Sergeant Dennis Tueller at this link

Recommended reading for anyone who is serious about concealed carry

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